Making, AND weathering real wooden ties in HO scale.

Just a simple way I'm making and weathering "old" ties in HO scale.

Warning! A portion of this article is explained two different ways. One version uses a grill lighter. Children should NOT attempt this with out adult supervision!

Now that thats out of the way, we can begin. For this article, you'll need the following:
● Hobby Knife
● Balsa wood sheet ~3/32" thick for HO
● Grill Lighter
● Brown, Gray & Black chalks
● Dullcote
● Rust colored paint
● Paint thinner
● OPEN AIR ROOM
● Tweezers or needle nose pliers

Optional replacements/removals:
● Pre-cut ties replacing the balsa sheet
● Not using the lighter

A little on my weathering and what I use. I used to use a old bit of track on a bit of wood to weather my rolling stock and locos but a friend gave me an old record player turntable that he had no use for so I've pulled it apart and made this for weathering on.

Weathering A Boxcar Roof

Products used to weather up a roof

© 2019 Josh Baakko https://www.modelrailroadtips.com
Featuring: @peabock510 on Instagram aka AmtrakTitan455 on YouTube

Modeling Rusty Bridges

By Keith Wilhite

Although it is possible to create the appearance of rust by using paints, chalks and other weathering materials, I discovered another way to do so during a visit to a paint store a few years ago. Located among faux finish paint products made by Modern Masters, I discovered a product called Metal Effects Iron Paint and Rust Activator.

The Iron Paint is a dark grey waterbased acrylic, which suspends the microscopic particles of genuine iron. It is a rather thick paint and will need to be thinned by as much as fifty percent with water, in order to pass through an air-brush. Only external mix air brushes are recommended, due to the thickness of the paint, even when thinned. It will require a fair amount of air pressure to move the paint, from thirty to forty PSI.

Gunky Hitches

© 2019, Josh Baakko, https://www.modelrailroadtips.com